AWI Transportation Projects

A host of District Department of Transportation (DDOT) transportation projects chronicled on this website will serve as the spine that supports the overall Anacostia Waterfront Initiative.  By providing better mobility – for walkers, cyclists, transit riders and drivers – these projects will reconnect communities on both sides to the river and to each other.

See below to learn more about each of the transportation projects included in the Anacostia Waterfront Initiative:

11th Street Bridge Park

The 11th Street Bridge Park, a project of the nonprofit Building Bridges Across the River, will be Washington, DC’s first elevated public park located on the piers of the old 11th Street Bridge spanning the Anacostia River.

Arboretum Bridge and Trail 

The Arboretum Bridge and Trail will be a key route designed specifically to provide the missing passageway between the Anacostia Waterfront and the U.S. National Arboretum, which alone garners over 500,000 visitors annually

11th Street Bridge

By far the largest DDOT project completed to date, the 11th Street Bridge Project is critical to improving travel and achieving the larger vision of the Anacostia Waterfront Initiative.

Interstate-295/Malcolm X Interchange

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) relocation onto the St. Elizabeths Campus requires substantial improvements to the I-295/Malcolm X Interchange and widening Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue SE to accommodate the expected increase in traffic.

Anacostia Riverwalk Trail

The Anacostia Riverwalk Trail serves as a backbone of the Anacostia Waterfront, connecting residents, visitors and communities to the river, one another and numerous commercial and recreational destinations.

Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens Trail 

This much-anticipated segment of the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail is now complete and provides the missing link in an almost 60-mile network of bicycle and pedestrian trails between the District of Columbia and Maryland.

Lincoln Connector Trail

The Lincoln Connector Trail Project will provide an important connection in Wards 5 and 7 by providing a bike and pedestrian trail connection from Fort Lincoln and surrounding neighborhoods across the Anacostia River to join the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens Segment of the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail.

Pennsylvania and Potomac Avenues SE Intersection Improvement Study

The Study proposes to enhance safety at these street intersections for neighborhood pedestrians and transit users of the Potomac Avenue Metrorail Station and the numerous area bus stops.

South Capitol Street Trail

The South Capitol Street Trail Project will extend the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail into the southernmost areas of the District of Columbia, filling a bicycle and pedestrian travel void for local communities.

M Street SE-SW Transportation Study

This study identified existing and future transportation challenges and ways to address them within a roughly 1.7-square-mile area along M Street SE/SW.

Parkside Pedestrian Bridge

Provides safe, well lit,

disabilities-accessible pedestrian travel between neighborhoods and a local Metrorail station now separated by DC 295 and two sets of railroad tracks just north of the Benning Road interchange.

Shepherds Branch Trail

The Shepherds Branch Trail is a proposed 3-mile long, shared-use path that will extend from the intersection of Firth Sterling Road SE and South Capitol Street SE to E Street SE.  The trail would connect the South Capitol Street Trail (currently in the design phase) to the Greenway neighborhood in Anacostia.

Southeast Boulevard  and Barney Circle

DDOT and FHWA are required to conduct studies under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to understand the environmental impacts of any changes proposed to Southeast Boulevard.

South Capitol Street Corridor Project Phase 1 (Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge Project)

This project calls for replacing the 68-year-old bridge and reconstruction of the Suitland Parkway/I-295 interchange. 

Virginia Avenue Tunnel

The Virginia Avenue Tunnel project replaces infrastructure that is more than 110 years old. The modernized tunnel will alleviate a critical rail bottleneck as well as help reduce highway congestion in the District, in the Washington region and nationwide.