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South Capitol Street Renderings

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South Capitol Street Corridor Project Flyover Animation – Update May 2014

Bridge Design Renderings

Click each image for a larger view

New Frederick Douglas Memorial Bridge Profile View New Frederick Douglas Memorial Bridge Aerial View New Frederick Douglas Memorial Bridge Aerial View 2

Traffic Oval East of Anacostia River and New I-295 Suitland Parkway Interchange SCapOvalUpdate

Traffic Oval West of Anacostia River

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Posted in: South Capitol Street Corridor Documents


12 thoughts on “South Capitol Street Renderings

  1. As a daily user of the South Capitol Street Corridor, I must say this looks like a great design. Less lights to hold everyone up and keep traffic moving.

    Would it be possible for a ramp to continue onto Suitland Pkwy so traffic doesn’t get held up at the light and there can be an exit for those that want to turn or enter 295? Just a suggestion.

    Lookinf forward to this!

  2. The oval rotary on the National’s Park side of the bridge certainly wastes a lot of space. Why not close Potomac Ave., SW and free up more land for housing or commercial development? Will there be traffic lights so that the “soccer field” within the rotary is accessible? It should be landscaped as a garden or planted with trees.

  3. ABSOLUTELY LOVE the new bridge design!! It looks fantastic. I hope that the huge traffice circles will be sites for major new memorials. It would really help to turn the South Capitol Street corridor into an extension of the National Mall, as L’Enfant envisioned and the NCPC has been pushing for now for four decades.

    I’m much less happy with what DDOT is planning for Anacostia. Anacostia’s waterfront is turning into a morass of interchanges — one at the 11th Street Bridges, now one here at South Capitol Street, and oh! wait! Now another one with Suitland Parkway.

    I’m sorry: This is my neighborhood. Where I live. It is not a dumping ground for the city’s cloverleafs. But that is exactly what the city seems to want to turn Anacostia into. Cutting the Anacostia waterfront off from the people who live here is the most bone-headed idea I have ever seen.

  4. This is great news for Anacostia, but I really hope DDOT doesn’t screw up the pedestrian element. It looks like there is ample space for pedestrians and bicyclists to coexist on both sides of traffic, but it would be helpful if they clearly paint a bicycle lane. Bicyclists know to stay out of the walkway; pedestrians know to stay out of the bike lane. I’m optimistic that they’ll get it right given Mayor Fenty’s (and now Gray’s) effective support of bicycling. Any pedestrian plan should also make the onramps highly accessible, which is not evident from the video rendering. I can only hope someone is consulting with WABA.

    • Glad to see more and more people are starting to agree with me that if we’re going to spend this much on a replacement bridge, which also memorializes one of DC’s greatest residents, we should make it’s an inspiring bridge.

      Thomas Luebke of the federal Commission on Fine Arts, on 9/27 called for a ““contemporary approach” and a “bolder look.” I agree with Becky that a suspension bridge would be appropriate.

      Let’s tell the Council to scrap the plan for this drab, bland, utilitarian piece of junk and pick a beautiful design of which we can all be proud.

  5. The signalized left turn onto I-295 northbound is sure to back up, particularly on game days. Wouldn’t it be better to have a flyover from either the I-295 southbound ramp or South Capitol Street as they exit the circle on the Anacostia side?

  6. The bridge would integrate into the pedestrian landscape much better if there were staircases and/or spiral ramps directly linking the bridge to the waterfront (and corresponding existing and planned ped/bike facilities). The planned connection is especially out of the way on the south side of the river.

  7. If anyone things this is a beautiful bridge, let’s look elsewhere for some definition. It is as bland and boring as the current one, only with one more lane. Is one more lane going to solve anything? This is the one area of town that could benefit by a bolder statement as it doesn’t block the view of any monument (unless you count Nats Stadium). Why can’t it honor the sailboats and even old time Navy vessels that once traveled on the Anacostia/Potomac with a suspension bridge much like the Boston version that is as dramatic during the daytime as it is at night?

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  9. I don’t see a bike/ped connection from these ovals to the Anacostia Metro station and the existing Suitland Trail. The trail is an important connection into the neighborhoods of Ward 8, and in the long run, to federal employment centers in Maryland. The missing connection to Metro (only about 1/4th of a mile between Anacostia Station and Pomeroy St. where the trailhead is) should be built as soon as possible to aid in station access, and ultimately access to the ART.

    A previous comment mentioned the lack of connections between the neighborhood and the ART, and I share his frustration. Every roadway crossing of 295 should include excellent crossings for pedestrians and cyclists, and to link more neighbors to the ART, DDOT should pursue creating a multi-use trail on the Shepherd Spur rail line so that people have a safe way to reach the few places where crossing 295 is possible.

  10. This bridge is just plain and boring. DC has a chance to create something new and something that inspires or at least pays homage to the past history of the area and all we have to show for it will be a paved road over water. I certainly hope that before the new “span” is constructed, that they would take a second look at designing the new bridge into something with much more character

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